None of the models developed so far succeed to explain exchange rates and volatility in the longer time frames. For shorter time frames (less than a few days), algorithms can be devised to predict prices. It is understood from the above models that many macroeconomic factors affect the exchange rates and in the end currency prices are a result of dual forces of demand and supply. The world's currency markets can be viewed as a huge melting pot: in a large and ever-changing mix of current events, supply and demand factors are constantly shifting, and the price of one currency in relation to another shifts accordingly. No other market encompasses (and distills) as much of what is going on in the world at any given time as foreign exchange.[74]
In order to make good FX predictions, we'll outline three types of trends that you need to know - uptrend, downtrend and sideways trend. For example, if the trend moves upwards in relation to the graph, then the chosen currency (USD) is actually appreciating in value and vice versa with the downtrend. If the trend moves downwards in relation to the graph, it is depreciating in value. As for the sideways trend, the currencies are neither depreciating or appreciating - they are in a stable condition. Knowing all this is key to making the right Forex daily predictions.
The need to exchange currencies is the primary reason why the forex market is the largest, most liquid financial market in the world. It dwarfs other markets in size, even the stock market, with an average traded value of around U.S. $2,000 billion per day. (The total volume changes all the time, but as of August 2012, the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) reported that the forex market traded in excess of U.S. $4.9 trillion per day.)
×