Forex traders should proceed with caution, because currency trades often involve high leverage rates of 1000 to 1. While this ratio offers tantalizing profit opportunities, it comes with an investor's risk of losing an entire investment on a single trade. In fact, a 2014 Citibank study found that just 30% of retail forex traders break even or better. But tellingly, 84% of those polled believe they can make money in the forex market. The chief takeaway: new forex investors should open accounts with firms that offer demo platforms, that let them make mock forex trades and tally imaginary gains and losses, until investors become seasoned enough to confidently trade for real.

To make a profit while Forex trading online, you need the market to move in your favour. You can help your chances of this by analysing the market in various ways. Technical analysis involves trends, historical data and current market movements. It’s more statistically focussed in examining charts and indicators. Alternatively, you could look at fundamental analysis, which focuses more on important economic events and announcements that may influence the market. Whichever type of analysis you decide to follow, you should look to build a formulated Forex trading strategy, incorporating wise decision making and appropriate money and risk management. The sum of your profit depends on the efficiency of your trading strategy, on how well you learn to predict market movements, your risk management strategy and on the amount you choose to deposit.
The foreign exchange market is the most liquid financial market in the world. Traders include governments and central banks, commercial banks, other institutional investors and financial institutions, currency speculators, other commercial corporations, and individuals. According to the 2010 Triennial Central Bank Survey, coordinated by the Bank for International Settlements, average daily turnover was $3.98 trillion in April 2010 (compared to $1.7 trillion in 1998).[57] Of this $3.98 trillion, $1.5 trillion was spot transactions and $2.5 trillion was traded in outright forwards, swaps, and other derivatives.
All forex trades involve two currencies because you're betting on the value of a currency against another. Think of EUR/USD, the most-traded currency pair in the world. EUR, the first currency in the pair, is the base, and USD, the second, is the counter. When you see a price quoted on your platform, that price is how much one euro is worth in US dollars. You always see two prices because one is the buy price and one is the sell. The difference between the two is the spread. When you click buy or sell, you are buying or selling the first currency in the pair.
There are three primary forex markets — spot, forwards, and futures markets. The spot market is by far the most popular, and consists of the real asset that both the futures and forwards markets are based on. Forex market participants range from international banks to enterprises that deal in various countries who are looking to hedge risk on the exchange rates they use for dealing in multiple currencies.
In the futures market, futures contracts are bought and sold based upon a standard size and settlement date on public commodities markets, such as the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. In the U.S., the National Futures Association regulates the futures market. Futures contracts have specific details, including the number of units being traded, delivery and settlement dates, and minimum price increments that cannot be customized. The exchange acts as a counterpart to the trader, providing clearance and settlement.
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