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Trading CFDs, FX, and cryptocurrencies involves a high degree of risk. All providers have a percentage of retail investor accounts that lose money when trading CFDs with their company. You should consider whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money and whether you understand how CFDs, FX, and cryptocurrencies work. All data was obtained from a published web site as of 02/18/2019 and is believed to be accurate, but is not guaranteed. The ForexBrokers.com staff is constantly working with its online broker representatives to obtain the latest data. If you believe any data listed above is inaccurate, please contact us using the link at the bottom of this page.
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In all cases, to make a meaningful description of trading hours worldwide, the opening and closing times at each location worldwide need to be presented with a common base reference time. In this article, for instance, the data is referenced to GMT. In other articles with a United States orientation, however, the common base reference time often used is Eastern Standard Time. It isn't wrong, but it's a little confusing for readers who don't distinguish between GMT and EST --something few persons other than forex traders and airline personnel need to deal with on a regular basis.
Foreign Exchange trading, also known as Forex or FX trading, has gained enormous popularity in recent years among layman individuals due to the growth of online brokers and the technological development of online trading platforms. With high liquidity, non-stop opening hours 5 days a week, and great opportunities, it is no wonder that the forex market is the world’s most traded market with a daily trading volume of $5 trillion USD.

In order to make good FX predictions, we'll outline three types of trends that you need to know - uptrend, downtrend and sideways trend. For example, if the trend moves upwards in relation to the graph, then the chosen currency (USD) is actually appreciating in value and vice versa with the downtrend. If the trend moves downwards in relation to the graph, it is depreciating in value. As for the sideways trend, the currencies are neither depreciating or appreciating - they are in a stable condition. Knowing all this is key to making the right Forex daily predictions.
Demo Account: Although demo accounts attempt to replicate real markets, they operate in a simulated market environment. As such, there are key differences that distinguish them from real accounts; including but not limited to, the lack of dependence on real-time market liquidity, a delay in pricing, and the availability of some products which may not be tradable on live accounts. The operational capabilities when executing orders in a demo environment may result in atypically, expedited transactions; lack of rejected orders; and/or the absence of slippage. There may be instances where margin requirements differ from those of live accounts as updates to demo accounts may not always coincide with those of real accounts.
^ The total sum is 200% because each currency trade always involves a currency pair; one currency is sold (e.g. US$) and another bought (€). Therefore each trade is counted twice, once under the sold currency ($) and once under the bought currency (€). The percentages above are the percent of trades involving that currency regardless of whether it is bought or sold, e.g. the U.S. Dollar is bought or sold in 87% of all trades, whereas the Euro is bought or sold 31% of the time.

These currency pairs, in addition to a variety of other combinations, account for over 95% of all speculative trading in the forex market. However, you will probably have noticed the US dollar is prevalent in the major currency pairings. This is because it’s the world’s leading reserve currency, playing a part in approximately 88% of currency trades.
As you could see the foreign exchange market is not so complex to understand and not so dangerous to enter. You can become one of its participants in a few minutes and start earning money more than easily. How to learn Forex trading and specifically how to use the online trading platform are thoroughly presented on our website. You can read our educational materials and trading e-books which will help you understand the essence of Forex trading, discover its benefits, learn how to trade effectively and how to manage your risk.
Once you have picked a market, you need to know the current price it is trading at, which you can do by bringing up an order ticket in the platform. All forex is quoted in terms of one currency versus another. Each currency pair has a ‘base’ currency and a ‘quote’ currency. The base currency is the currency on the left of the currency pair and the quote currency is on the right. Put simply, when trading foreign currencies, you would:
These currency pairs, in addition to a variety of other combinations, account for over 95% of all speculative trading in the forex market. However, you will probably have noticed the US dollar is prevalent in the major currency pairings. This is because it’s the world’s leading reserve currency, playing a part in approximately 88% of currency trades.

The simplest answer is that the forex is open for trading all the time, but that the specific hours it opens and closes at any given location depending upon where you are in the world. The base reference time for all opening and closing times worldwide is Greenwich Mean Time, commonly abbreviated GMT. Many websites devoted to clarifying forex business hours describe the opening and closing times with three or four significant examples, usually
The modern foreign exchange market began forming during the 1970s. This followed three decades of government restrictions on foreign exchange transactions under the Bretton Woods system of monetary management, which set out the rules for commercial and financial relations among the world's major industrial states after World War II. Countries gradually switched to floating exchange rates from the previous exchange rate regime, which remained fixed per the Bretton Woods system.
Many currency pairs will move about 50 to 100 pips (sometimes more or less depending on overall market conditions) a day. A pip (an acronym for Point in Percentage) is the name used to indicate the fourth decimal place in a currency pair, or the second decimal place when JPY is in the pair. When the price of the EUR/USD moves from 1.3600 to 1.3650, that's a 50 pip move; if you bought the pair at 1.3600 and sold it at 1.3650 you'd make a 50-pip profit.
Trading currencies is the act of making predictions based on minuscule variations in the global economy and buying and selling accordingly. The exchange rate between two currencies is the rate at which one currency will be exchanged for another. Forex traders use available data to analyze currencies and countries like you would companies, thereby using economic forecasts to gain an idea of the currency's true value.
Historically, different international monetary systems have emphasized different policy mixes. For instance, the Bretton Woods system emphasized the first two at the expense of free capital movement. The collapse of the system destroyed the stability and predictability of the currency markets. The resultant large fluctuations meant a rise in exchange rate risk (as well as in profit opportunities). Governments now face numerous challenges that are often captured under the term globalization or capital mobility: the move to floating exchange rates, the political liberalization of capital controls, and technological and financial innovation.
In the above example, we bet that the EUR will go up against the USD, so we bought EUR/USD hoping to sell it later at a higher price. This is called long position. What should you do if you expect the EUR to go down against the USD? Well, then you do the opposite - you sell the EUR/USD with the hope to buy it cheaper later on. This short trading is how you take advantage of exchange rates that are going down.
Live Spreads Widget: Dynamic live spreads are available on Active Trader commission-based accounts. When static spreads are displayed, the figures are time-weighted averages derived from tradable prices at FXCM from October 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018. Spreads are variable and are subject to delay. The spread figures are for informational purposes only. FXCM is not liable for errors, omissions or delays, or for actions relying on this information.
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