There are many different ways to analyse the Foreign Exchange market, in anticipation of trading. Although the categories of analysis may be quite plentiful, your task is to keep the end goal in sight. This is in order to utilise the analysis to indicate good trading opportunities. We are now going to describe the two main areas of FX analysis, and explore them in greater detail. They are closely connected with making the right Forex trading predictions. It is also important to highlight that trying out both areas may help determine which method - or what degree of combination - suits your personality.

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Governments / Central banks – A country’s central bank can play an important role in the foreign exchange markets. They can cause an increase or decrease in the value of their nation’s currency by trying to control money supply, inflation, and (or) interest rates. They can use their substantial foreign exchange reserves to try and stabilize the market.
A Cycle Forex Prediction Indicator determines the timing of a concrete Forex market pattern. It would be unwise for us not to mention support and resistance - they describe the levels of price where markets frequently rise or fall, and then reverse. Finally, the last one in our list is momentum. These indicators define whether the trend will be strong or weak after it progresses over a certain period of time. Momentum is highest at the time a trend starts, and lowest when it changes.

Big news comes in and then the market starts to spike or plummets rapidly. At this point it may be tempting to jump on the easy-money train, however, doing so without a disciplined trading plan behind you can be just as damaging as gambling before the news comes out. This is because illiquidity and sharp price movements mean a trade can quickly translate into significant losses as large swings take place or ‘whipsaw’.


Investment management firms (who typically manage large accounts on behalf of customers such as pension funds and endowments) use the foreign exchange market to facilitate transactions in foreign securities. For example, an investment manager bearing an international equity portfolio needs to purchase and sell several pairs of foreign currencies to pay for foreign securities purchases.
Currency trading and exchange first occurred in ancient times.[4] Money-changers (people helping others to change money and also taking a commission or charging a fee) were living in the Holy Land in the times of the Talmudic writings (Biblical times). These people (sometimes called "kollybistẻs") used city stalls, and at feast times the Temple's Court of the Gentiles instead.[5] Money-changers were also the silversmiths and/or goldsmiths[6] of more recent ancient times.

One unique aspect of this international market is that there is no central marketplace for foreign exchange. Rather, currency trading is conducted electronically over-the-counter (OTC), which means that all transactions occur via computer networks between traders around the world, rather than on one centralized exchange. The market is open 24 hours a day, five and a half days a week, and currencies are traded worldwide in the major financial centers of London, New York, Tokyo, Zurich, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Singapore, Paris and Sydney - across almost every time zone. This means that when the trading day in the U.S. ends, the forex market begins anew in Tokyo and Hong Kong. As such, the forex market can be extremely active any time of the day, with price quotes changing constantly.
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