Currencies are traded on the Foreign Exchange market, also known as Forex. This is a decentralized market that spans the globe and is considered the largest by trading volume and the most liquid worldwide. Exchange rates fluctuate continuously due to the ever changing market forces of supply and demand. Forex traders buy a currency pair if they think the exchange rate will rise and sell it if they think the opposite will happen. The Forex market remains open around the world for 24 hours a day with the exception of weekends.
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Before we proceed, we need to answer the question - what is the Forex market? Simply put, It is a global decentralised market for trading currencies. Moreover, it is the largest market in the world, processing trillions of dollars worth of transactions every day. The key participants in it are international banks, hedge funds, commercial companies, various central banks and, of course, retail FX brokers and investors.
Foreign exchange market is composed of different participants, also called Forex market players, who trade on the market for quite various reasons. This means that participating in Forex market transactions does not take place simply for speculative purpose. Each of the participants plays its own role in the market providing the latter’s wholeness and stability.

International parity conditions: Relative purchasing power parity, interest rate parity, Domestic Fisher effect, International Fisher effect. Though to some extent the above theories provide logical explanation for the fluctuations in exchange rates, yet these theories falter as they are based on challengeable assumptions [e.g., free flow of goods, services and capital] which seldom hold true in the real world.
It is estimated that in the UK, 14% of currency transfers/payments are made via Foreign Exchange Companies.[68] These companies' selling point is usually that they will offer better exchange rates or cheaper payments than the customer's bank.[69] These companies differ from Money Transfer/Remittance Companies in that they generally offer higher-value services. The volume of transactions done through Foreign Exchange Companies in India amounts to about US$2 billion[70] per day This does not compete favorably with any well developed foreign exchange market of international repute, but with the entry of online Foreign Exchange Companies the market is steadily growing. Around 25% of currency transfers/payments in India are made via non-bank Foreign Exchange Companies.[71] Most of these companies use the USP of better exchange rates than the banks. They are regulated by FEDAI and any transaction in foreign Exchange is governed by the Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999 (FEMA).
Both types of contracts are binding and are typically settled for cash for the exchange in question upon expiry, although contracts can also be bought and sold before they expire. The forwards and futures markets can offer protection against risk when trading currencies. Usually, big international corporations use these markets in order to hedge against future exchange rate fluctuations, but speculators take part in these markets as well.
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