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In the above example, we bet that the EUR will go up against the USD, so we bought EUR/USD hoping to sell it later at a higher price. This is called long position. What should you do if you expect the EUR to go down against the USD? Well, then you do the opposite - you sell the EUR/USD with the hope to buy it cheaper later on. This short trading is how you take advantage of exchange rates that are going down.
Before we proceed, we need to answer the question - what is the Forex market? Simply put, It is a global decentralised market for trading currencies. Moreover, it is the largest market in the world, processing trillions of dollars worth of transactions every day. The key participants in it are international banks, hedge funds, commercial companies, various central banks and, of course, retail FX brokers and investors.
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The Tokyo session follows shortly after. This session is also called the Asian session, because right after Tokyo large economic hubs like Singapore and Hong Kong start waking up. The Asian session starts around 00:00 GMT time, when most of Europe is in a deep sleep. This is why you often hear European traders talking about waking up at 3am to trade the Asian session before going back to bed.
Being capable of identifying trends is one of the core skills a Forex trader should possess, as it can prove to be highly useful in making any Forex market prediction. The trend is the general direction of a market or an asset price. Trends may vary in length, from short to intermediate, or to long term. Being able to identify a trend can prove to be highly profitable, and the reason is that you will be able to trade with the trend.

Hedge funds – Somewhere around 70 to 90% of all foreign exchange transactions are speculative in nature. This means, the person or institutions that bought or sold the currency has no plan of actually taking delivery of the currency; instead, the transaction was executed with sole intention of speculating on the price movement of that particular currency. Retail speculators (you and I) are small cheese compared to the big hedge funds that control and speculate with billions of dollars of equity each day in the currency markets.
The essence of technical analysis is that it attempts to forecast future price movements in the FX market by thoroughly examining past market data, particularly price data. The idea is that history may repeat itself in predictable patterns. In turn, those patterns, produced by movements in price, are called Forex signals. This is the goal of technical analysis - is to uncover current signals of a market by inspecting past Forex market signals. This may help traders perform daily Forex predictions. In addition, prices move in trends. Technical analysts are inclined to believe that price fluctuations are not random, and are not unpredictable by nature. Once a certain type of trend is established, it is likely to continue for a certain period of time.
The foreign exchange market is the most liquid financial market in the world. Traders include governments and central banks, commercial banks, other institutional investors and financial institutions, currency speculators, other commercial corporations, and individuals. According to the 2010 Triennial Central Bank Survey, coordinated by the Bank for International Settlements, average daily turnover was $3.98 trillion in April 2010 (compared to $1.7 trillion in 1998).[57] Of this $3.98 trillion, $1.5 trillion was spot transactions and $2.5 trillion was traded in outright forwards, swaps, and other derivatives.
National central banks play an important role in the foreign exchange markets. They try to control the money supply, inflation, and/or interest rates and often have official or unofficial target rates for their currencies. They can use their often substantial foreign exchange reserves to stabilize the market. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of central bank "stabilizing speculation" is doubtful because central banks do not go bankrupt if they make large losses as other traders would. There is also no convincing evidence that they actually make a profit from trading.
There are actually three ways that institutions, corporations and individuals trade forex: the spot market, the forwards market and the futures market. The forex trading in the spot market always has been the largest market because it is the "underlying" real asset that the forwards and futures markets are based on. In the past, the futures market was the most popular venue for traders because it was available to individual investors for a longer period of time. However, with the advent of electronic trading and numerous forex brokers, the spot market has witnessed a huge surge in activity and now surpasses the futures market as the preferred trading market for individual investors and speculators. When people refer to the forex market, they usually are referring to the spot market. The forwards and futures markets tend to be more popular with companies that need to hedge their foreign exchange risks out to a specific date in the future.
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