For example – the rate you find for GBP/USD represents the number of US dollars one British pound will buy you. So, if you have reason to believe the pound will increase in value versus the US dollar, you’d look to purchase pounds with US dollars. However, if the exchange rate climbs, you’d sell your pounds back and make a profit. Likewise with Euros, Yen etc
Forex trading as it relates to retail traders (like you and I) is the speculation on the price of one currency against another. For example, if you think the euro is going to rise against the U.S. dollar, you can buy the EURUSD currency pair low and then (hopefully) sell it at a higher price to make a profit. Of course, if you buy the euro against the dollar (EURUSD), and the U.S. dollar strengthens, you will then be in a losing position. So, it’s important to be aware of the risk involved in trading Forex, and not only the reward.
These cover the bulk of countries outside Europe. Forex brokers catering for India, Hong Kong, Qatar etc are likely to have regulation in one of the above, rather than every country they support. Some brands are regulated across the globe (one is even regulated in 5 continents). Some bodies issue licenses, and others have a register of legal firms.
Up until World War I, currencies were pegged to precious metals, such as gold and silver. But the system collapsed and was replaced by the Bretton Woods agreement after the second world war. That agreement resulted in the creation of three international organizations to facilitate economic activity across the globe. They were the International Monetary Fund (IMF), General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD). The new system also replaced gold with the US dollar as peg for international currencies. The US government promised to back up dollar supplies with equivalent gold reserves.

The value of your investments can go down as well as up. Losses can exceed deposits on margin products. Complex products, including CFDs and FX, come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs, FX or any of our other products work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money. 74% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider.
The value of your investments can go down as well as up. Losses can exceed deposits on margin products. Complex products, including CFDs and FX, come with a high risk of losing money rapidly due to leverage. You should consider whether you understand how CFDs, FX or any of our other products work and whether you can afford to take the high risk of losing your money. 74% of retail investor accounts lose money when trading CFDs with this provider.
The information on this site may be accessed worldwide however it is not directed at residents in any country or jurisdiction where such distribution or use would be contrary to local law or regulation. Forexboat Pty Ltd is not registered with any US regulator including the National Futures Association (“NFA”) and Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) therefore products and services offered on this website is not intended for residents of the United States.
Forex traders should proceed with caution, because currency trades often involve high leverage rates of 1000 to 1. While this ratio offers tantalizing profit opportunities, it comes with an investor's risk of losing an entire investment on a single trade. In fact, a 2014 Citibank study found that just 30% of retail forex traders break even or better. But tellingly, 84% of those polled believe they can make money in the forex market. The chief takeaway: new forex investors should open accounts with firms that offer demo platforms, that let them make mock forex trades and tally imaginary gains and losses, until investors become seasoned enough to confidently trade for real.
Just like stocks, you can trade currency based on what you think its value is (or where it's headed). But the big difference with forex is that you can trade up or down just as easily. If you think a currency will increase in value, you can buy it. If you think it will decrease, you can sell it. With a market this large, finding a buyer when you're selling and a seller when you're buying is much easier than in other markets. Maybe you hear on the news that China is devaluing its currency to draw more foreign business into its country. If you think that trend will continue, you could make a forex trade by selling the Chinese currency against another currency, say, the US dollar. The more the Chinese currency devalues against the US dollar, the higher your profits. If the Chinese currency increases in value while you have your sell position open, then your losses increase and you want to get out of the trade.
In forex, currencies are quoted in pairs. Let’s take the most popular currency pair as an example, EUR/USD. The first currency (Euro in this case) is called the base currency and the second (USD) is called the quote currency. When you trade a pair you are speculating on whether the base currency (EUR) will strengthen or weaken against the quote currency (USD).
Risk warning: Trading Forex (foreign exchange) or CFDs (contracts for difference) on margin carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors. There is a possibility that you may sustain a loss equal to or greater than your entire investment. Therefore, you should not invest or risk money that you cannot afford to lose. Before using Admiral Markets UK Ltd, Admiral Markets AS or Admiral Markets Cyprus Ltd services, please acknowledge all of the risks associated with trading.
High Risk Investment Notice: Trading Forex/CFD's on margin carries a high level of risk and may not be suitable for all investors as you could sustain losses in excess of deposits. The products are intended for retail, professional and eligible counterparty clients. For clients who maintain account(s) with Forex Capital Markets Limited (“FXCM LTD”), retail clients could sustain a total loss of deposited funds but are not subject to subsequent payment obligations beyond the deposited funds and professional clients could sustain losses in excess of deposits. Prior to trading any products offered by FXCM LTD, inclusive of all EU branches, FXCM Australia Pty. Limited, FXCM South Africa (PTY) Ltd, any affiliates of aforementioned firms, or other firms within the FXCM group of companies [collectively the "FXCM Group"], carefully consider your financial situation and experience level. If you decide to trade products offered by FXCM Australia Pty. Limited ("FXCM AU") (AFSL 309763), you must read and understand the Financial Services Guide, Product Disclosure Statement and Terms of Business. Our Forex/CFD prices are set by FXCM, are not made on an Exchange and are not governed under the Financial Advisory and Intermediary Services Act. The FXCM Group may provide general commentary which is not intended as investment advice and must not be construed as such. Seek advice from a separate financial advisor. The FXCM Group assumes no liability for errors, inaccuracies or omissions; does not warrant the accuracy, completeness of information, text, graphics, links or other items contained within these materials. Read and understand the Terms and Conditions on the FXCM Group’s websites prior to taking further action.
In forex, currencies are quoted in pairs. Let’s take the most popular currency pair as an example, EUR/USD. The first currency (Euro in this case) is called the base currency and the second (USD) is called the quote currency. When you trade a pair you are speculating on whether the base currency (EUR) will strengthen or weaken against the quote currency (USD).
The forex market consists of trading pairs of international fiat currencies pegged against each other where traders speculate and hedge risk on the price of a specific national currency appreciating or depreciating relative to another currency. Interestingly, there is no central forex exchange, and all trading is open 24 hours a day, more than 5 days a week, with OTC financial trading centers operating in major cities around the world.
Starting with $500 gives some flexibility in how you can trade; $100 doesn't. If you want to day trade forex, start with at least $500. No matter what balance you start with, limit risk to 1% of your account balance on each trade. Alter the above scenarios to help determine what your position size should be based on the stop loss level you use and what type of lot (micro, mini or standard) you're trading.
Forex, also known as foreign exchange, FX or currency trading, is a decentralized global market where all the world's currencies trade. The forex market is the largest, most liquid market in the world with an average daily trading volume exceeding $5 trillion. All the world's combined stock markets don't even come close to this. But what does that mean to you? Take a closer look at forex trading and you may find some exciting trading opportunities unavailable with other investments.
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