In all cases, to make a meaningful description of trading hours worldwide, the opening and closing times at each location worldwide need to be presented with a common base reference time. In this article, for instance, the data is referenced to GMT. In other articles with a United States orientation, however, the common base reference time often used is Eastern Standard Time. It isn't wrong, but it's a little confusing for readers who don't distinguish between GMT and EST --something few persons other than forex traders and airline personnel need to deal with on a regular basis.
One of the largest risks in forex trading is leverages. Most forex brokers permit you to hold a certain of money in your account but then leverage that amount by over 200 times. This could bring in a lot of profit if you are on the winning side, but on the other, an overwhelming loss if you should find yourself on the losing end. The best way to stay clear of this is to use some of the feature built in on the trading software, an example is the Stop Loss features and negative balances.
If you scrupulously trail all events, micro factors and macro factors, you have a much higher chance of success in making your predictions. But you should understand that this is not easy. There are some sites that offer so-called free Forex predictions, but you should avoid them, as they are not reliable. To track economic announcements, forecasts, and other important information related to Forex, many professional FX traders use a Forex Calendar.
The Tokyo session follows shortly after. This session is also called the Asian session, because right after Tokyo large economic hubs like Singapore and Hong Kong start waking up. The Asian session starts around 00:00 GMT time, when most of Europe is in a deep sleep. This is why you often hear European traders talking about waking up at 3am to trade the Asian session before going back to bed.
In the ever changing business world you need to be forward thinking, if you want to have the potential to be successful. If you talk with successful Forex traders or investors in the Forex market, they will undoubtedly highlight their ability and knowledge of how to predict Forex market. This article has been prepared to help you apply your FX knowledge by predicting the changing nature of the foreign exchange market in the most appropriate way.
HIGH RISK WARNING: Foreign exchange trading carries a high level of risk that may not be suitable for all investors. Leverage creates additional risk and loss exposure. Before you decide to trade foreign exchange, carefully consider your investment objectives, experience level, and risk tolerance. You could lose some or all of your initial investment; do not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. Educate yourself on the risks associated with foreign exchange trading, and seek advice from an independent financial or tax advisor if you have any questions. Any data and information is provided 'as is' solely for informational purposes, and is not intended for trading purposes or advice. Past performance is not indicative of future results.
Forex, also known as foreign exchange, FX or currency trading, is a decentralized global market where all the world's currencies trade. The forex market is the largest, most liquid market in the world with an average daily trading volume exceeding $5 trillion. All the world's combined stock markets don't even come close to this. But what does that mean to you? Take a closer look at forex trading and you may find some exciting trading opportunities unavailable with other investments.
I’m currently in the middle of creating a video-course for Traders who are just starting out into the unbound Forex Market. In one of the tutorials I talk about Forex Market Hours and I needed a World Map which would visualize Forex Timezones. I looked around but couldn’t find anything decent – all of them were either poorly made or in bad resolution. So I created my own forex market hours map which I want to share with you today!

In all cases, to make a meaningful description of trading hours worldwide, the opening and closing times at each location worldwide need to be presented with a common base reference time. In this article, for instance, the data is referenced to GMT. In other articles with a United States orientation, however, the common base reference time often used is Eastern Standard Time. It isn't wrong, but it's a little confusing for readers who don't distinguish between GMT and EST --something few persons other than forex traders and airline personnel need to deal with on a regular basis.
FXCM UK offers tax exempt spread betting accounts exclusively to UK and Ireland residents. Residents of other countries are NOT eligible. Spread betting is not intended for distribution to, or use by any person in any country and jurisdiction where such distribution or use would be contrary to local law or regulation. The UK tax treatment of your financial betting activities depends on your individual circumstances and may be subject to change. Spread Betting accounts offer spread plus mark-up pricing only. Spreads are variable and are subject to delay.
For high volume traders, FOREX.com offers an Active Trader program with five tiers of pricing. Level one starts with typical spreads of 1.2 pips on the EUR/USD for traders who have a balance of least $25,000. Spreads are further reduced with each subsequent level as traders surpass specific month-to-date (MTD) trading volume thresholds. For example, level five brings spreads as low as 0.84 pips on a pair for traders who reach higher than $500 million in MTD volume.
With spread betting you stake a certain amount (in your account currency) per pip movement in the price of the forex pair. So for instance you might buy (or sell) £10 per pip on USD/JPY, to make £10 for every pip the US dollar rises (or falls) against the Japanese yen. Forex traders have been using spread betting to capitalise on short-term movements for many years now. Find out more about spread betting.
The EURUSD has dragged back down after what was a relatively strong run higher into the NY session.   The price has just moved back below a broken trend line (tilt lower) and the 1.1300 level as well. The price is currently testing the 38.2% of the days range the 50% is at 1.1286 which corresponds with earlier highs this week from Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday.   A move below that level would negate a lot of the bullish momentum seen ealier today. 
NZDUSD bounced nicely off its support at 0.6723 (100% Fibonacci extension, 61.8% Fibonacci retracement, horizontal swing low support) where it could potentially bounce to its resistance at 0.6765 (61.8% Fibonacci retracement, horizontal swing high resistance). Stochastic (55, 5, 3) is bounced off its support at 2.05% where a corresponding rise could occur.
Forex trading scams are a concern for even the savviest investor. Foreign exchange fraud has been on a rise for the best couple decades, leading the Commodities Futures Trading Commision and other agencies to deploy task forces analyzing and curtailing schemes. The ingenuity of fraudulent schemes, whether they’re based on phony software or creating fake accounts, increases, but their telltale signs remain largely the same. Steer clear of forex brokerages promising sure wins, fast results, or secret formulas for success. The market has proved time and again that there are no shortcuts. Scammers bank on the human propensity to believe otherwise.
The main trading centers are London and New York City, though Tokyo, Hong Kong, and Singapore are all important centers as well. Banks throughout the world participate. Currency trading happens continuously throughout the day; as the Asian trading session ends, the European session begins, followed by the North American session and then back to the Asian session.
There are many different ways to analyse the Foreign Exchange market, in anticipation of trading. Although the categories of analysis may be quite plentiful, your task is to keep the end goal in sight. This is in order to utilise the analysis to indicate good trading opportunities. We are now going to describe the two main areas of FX analysis, and explore them in greater detail. They are closely connected with making the right Forex trading predictions. It is also important to highlight that trying out both areas may help determine which method - or what degree of combination - suits your personality.
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) limits leverage available to retail forex traders in the United States to 50:1 on major currency pairs and 20:1 for all others. OANDA Asia Pacific offers maximum leverage of 50:1 on FX products and limits to leverage offered on CFDs apply. Maximum leverage for OANDA Canada clients is determined by IIROC and is subject to change. For more information refer to our regulatory and financial compliance section.
The Foreign Exchange market, also called FOREX or FX, is the global market for currency trading. With a daily volume of more than $5.3 trillion, it is the biggest and most exciting financial market in the world. Whether you sell EUR 100 to buy US dollars at the airport or a bank exchanges 100 million US dollars for Japanese yen with another bank, both are FOREX deals. The players on the FOREX market range from huge financial organizations, managing billions, to individuals trading a few hundred dollars.

The essence of technical analysis is that it attempts to forecast future price movements in the FX market by thoroughly examining past market data, particularly price data. The idea is that history may repeat itself in predictable patterns. In turn, those patterns, produced by movements in price, are called Forex signals. This is the goal of technical analysis - is to uncover current signals of a market by inspecting past Forex market signals. This may help traders perform daily Forex predictions. In addition, prices move in trends. Technical analysts are inclined to believe that price fluctuations are not random, and are not unpredictable by nature. Once a certain type of trend is established, it is likely to continue for a certain period of time.
When you trade forex, you're effectively borrowing the first currency in the pair to buy or sell the second currency. With a US$5-trillion-a-day market, the liquidity is so deep that liquidity providers—the big banks, basically—allow you to trade with leverage. To trade with leverage, you simply set aside the required margin for your trade size. If you're trading 200:1 leverage, for example, you can trade £2,000 in the market while only setting aside £10 in margin in your trading account. For 50:1 leverage, the same trade size would still only require about £40 in margin. This gives you much more exposure, while keeping your capital investment down.
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