The foreign exchange ("forex" or "FX") currency market is not traded on a regulated exchange like stocks and commodities. Rather, the market consists of a network of financial institutions and retail trading brokers which each have their own individual hours of operation. Since most participants trade between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. in their local time zone, these times are used as the market open and close times, respectively.
Meanwhile, daily interbank settlements are also a mover of these markets as forex or broker-dealers, such as banks, are amongst the biggest participants in the forex market. Since these dealers interact with each other, this market is referred to as the interbank market. Large corporations, including exporters and importers, will also use the FX market to hedge currency exposure in order to prevent losses due to the fluctuating value of currencies.
So, yes, at any given trading center, it's an eight hour day. But that really doesn't matter, because somewhere in the world trading centers are open. You can trade anytime you want, although you should also note that you'll get the narrowest spreads -- the broker's profit margin -- when the maximum number of trading centers are open or, more precisely, when the trading volume for your currency trade is greatest. 
Another possible source of confusion is that GMT is always just that, summer, winter and fall. Eastern time, however, comes in two flavors: Eastern Standard Time (EST) and Eastern Daylight Time. Since the agreed-upon reference time worldwide is actually GMT, which has no Greenwich Mean Daylight Savings Time, this means that a New York trader who chooses to reference Eastern time rather than GMT, must keep in mind that during Daylight Savings Time in New York, the trading hours shift by an hour because the GMT reference time, needless to say, does not shift.

Currencies are always traded in pairs, so the "value" of one of the currencies in that pair is relative to the value of the other. This determines how much of country A's currency country B can buy, and vice versa. Establishing this relationship (price) for the global markets is the main function of the foreign exchange market. This also greatly enhances liquidity in all other financial markets, which is key to overall stability.


USDJPY is approaching our first resistance at 112.16 (78.6% Fibonacci retracement, 61.8% Fibonacci extension, horizontal overlap resistance) where a strong drop might occur below this level pushing price down to our major support at 111.38 (61.8% Fibonacci retracement). Stochastic (89,5,3) is also approaching resistance and we might see a corresponding drop in...

These cover the bulk of countries outside Europe. Forex brokers catering for India, Hong Kong, Qatar etc are likely to have regulation in one of the above, rather than every country they support. Some brands are regulated across the globe (one is even regulated in 5 continents). Some bodies issue licenses, and others have a register of legal firms.
The Tokyo session follows shortly after. This session is also called the Asian session, because right after Tokyo large economic hubs like Singapore and Hong Kong start waking up. The Asian session starts around 00:00 GMT time, when most of Europe is in a deep sleep. This is why you often hear European traders talking about waking up at 3am to trade the Asian session before going back to bed.
Forex pairs trade in 1000, 10,000 and 100,000 units, called micro, mini and standard lots. When starting out in forex day trading it's recommended traders open a micro lot account. Trading micro lots allows for more flexibility so risk remains below 1% of the account on each trade. For example, a micro-lot trader can buy $6,000 worth of currency, or $14,000, or $238,000 but if they open a mini lot account they can only trade in increments of $10,000, so $10,000, $20,000, etc. If trading standard lots, a trader can only take positions of $100,000, $200,000, etc.

Traders who understand indicators such as Bollinger bands or MACD will be more than capable of setting up their own alerts. But for the time poor, a paid service might prove fruitful. You would of course, need enough time to actually place the trades, and you need to be confident in the supplier. It is unlikely that someone with a profitable signal strategy is willing to share it cheaply (or at all). Beware of any promises that seem too good to be true.
Forex pairs trade in 1000, 10,000 and 100,000 units, called micro, mini and standard lots. When starting out in forex day trading it's recommended traders open a micro lot account. Trading micro lots allows for more flexibility so risk remains below 1% of the account on each trade. For example, a micro-lot trader can buy $6,000 worth of currency, or $14,000, or $238,000 but if they open a mini lot account they can only trade in increments of $10,000, so $10,000, $20,000, etc. If trading standard lots, a trader can only take positions of $100,000, $200,000, etc.
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One of the most unique features of the forex market is that it is comprised of a global network of financial centers that transact 24 hours a day, closing only on the weekends. As one major forex hub closes, another hub in a different part of the world remains open for business. This increases the liquidity available in currency markets, which adds to its appeal as the largest asset class available to investors.
In the contemporary international monetary system, floating exchange rates are the norm. However, different governments pursue a variety of alternative policy mixes or attempt to minimize exchange rate fluctuations through different strategies. For example, the United States displayed a preference for ad hoc international coordination, such as the Plaza Agreement in 1985 and the Louvre Accord in 1987, to intervene and manage the price of the dollar. Europe responded by forging ahead with a regional monetary union based on the desire to eliminate exchange rate risk, whereas many developing governments with smaller economies chose the route of “dollarization”—that is, either fixing to or choosing to have the dollar as their currency.
Both types of contracts are binding and are typically settled for cash for the exchange in question upon expiry, although contracts can also be bought and sold before they expire. The forwards and futures markets can offer protection against risk when trading currencies. Usually, big international corporations use these markets in order to hedge against future exchange rate fluctuations, but speculators take part in these markets as well.
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