Currencies are traded against one another in pairs. Each currency pair thus constitutes an individual trading product and is traditionally noted XXXYYY or XXX/YYY, where XXX and YYY are the ISO 4217 international three-letter code of the currencies involved. The first currency (XXX) is the base currency that is quoted relative to the second currency (YYY), called the counter currency (or quote currency). For instance, the quotation EURUSD (EUR/USD) 1.5465 is the price of the Euro expressed in US dollars, meaning 1 euro = 1.5465 dollars. The market convention is to quote most exchange rates against the USD with the US dollar as the base currency (e.g. USDJPY, USDCAD, USDCHF). The exceptions are the British pound (GBP), Australian dollar (AUD), the New Zealand dollar (NZD) and the euro (EUR) where the USD is the counter currency (e.g. GBPUSD, AUDUSD, NZDUSD, EURUSD).
How much each pip is worth is called the "pip value." For any pair where the USD is listed second in the currency pair, the above-mentioned pip values apply. If the USD is listed first, the pip value may be slightly different. To find the pip value of the USD/CHF for example, divide the normal pip value (mentioned above) by the current USD/CHF exchange rate. For example, a micro lot is worth $0.10/0.9435 = $0.1060, where 0.9435 is the current price of the pair and subject to change. For JPY pairs (USD/JPY), go through this same process, but then multiply by 100. For a more detailed explanation, see Calculating Pip Value for Different Forex Pairs and Account Currencies.

Investors should stick to the major and minor pairs in the beginning. This is because it will be easier to find trades, and lower spreads, making scalping viable. Exotic pairs, however, have much more illiquidity and higher spreads. In fact, because they are riskier, you can make serious cash with exotic pairs, just be prepared to lose big in a single session too.
Most developed countries permit the trading of derivative products (such as futures and options on futures) on their exchanges. All these developed countries already have fully convertible capital accounts. Some governments of emerging markets do not allow foreign exchange derivative products on their exchanges because they have capital controls. The use of derivatives is growing in many emerging economies.[60] Countries such as South Korea, South Africa, and India have established currency futures exchanges, despite having some capital controls.
Foreign exchange market is composed of different participants, also called Forex market players, who trade on the market for quite various reasons. This means that participating in Forex market transactions does not take place simply for speculative purpose. Each of the participants plays its own role in the market providing the latter’s wholeness and stability.
A growing portion of forex market participants is retail traders who invest through banks or brokers. The two primary types of brokers for retail traders are brokers and market makers. Brokers take a fee from customers for finding the best price and trading on behalf of them while market makers are the principal in a transaction against a retail trader.

Most developed countries permit the trading of derivative products (such as futures and options on futures) on their exchanges. All these developed countries already have fully convertible capital accounts. Some governments of emerging markets do not allow foreign exchange derivative products on their exchanges because they have capital controls. The use of derivatives is growing in many emerging economies.[60] Countries such as South Korea, South Africa, and India have established currency futures exchanges, despite having some capital controls.
NZDUSD bounced nicely off its support at 0.6723 (100% Fibonacci extension, 61.8% Fibonacci retracement, horizontal swing low support) where it could potentially bounce to its resistance at 0.6765 (61.8% Fibonacci retracement, horizontal swing high resistance). Stochastic (55, 5, 3) is bounced off its support at 2.05% where a corresponding rise could occur.
Want to start day trading forex? Thankfully the (foreign exchange) forex market is the most accessible financial market, only requiring a small amount of capital to open an account. But, just because forex brokers only require a small initial deposit doesn't mean that is the recommended minimum. Based on your goals and trading style here's how much capital you need to start day trading forex.

The simplest answer is that the forex is open for trading all the time, but that the specific hours it opens and closes at any given location depending upon where you are in the world. The base reference time for all opening and closing times worldwide is Greenwich Mean Time, commonly abbreviated GMT. Many websites devoted to clarifying forex business hours describe the opening and closing times with three or four significant examples, usually

International parity conditions: Relative purchasing power parity, interest rate parity, Domestic Fisher effect, International Fisher effect. Though to some extent the above theories provide logical explanation for the fluctuations in exchange rates, yet these theories falter as they are based on challengeable assumptions [e.g., free flow of goods, services and capital] which seldom hold true in the real world.

Unlike trading on an exchange where the contract sizes are predetermined, when trading forex online, you get to decide the size of your positions. This allows traders to start with the capital they feel comfortable with. At ThinkMarkets, you can start participating in the fascinating currency markets with no minimum deposit requirement for a Standard account and only $500 minimum deposit for a ThinkZero account.


The most common type of forward transaction is the foreign exchange swap. In a swap, two parties exchange currencies for a certain length of time and agree to reverse the transaction at a later date. These are not standardized contracts and are not traded through an exchange. A deposit is often required in order to hold the position open until the transaction is completed.
The Forex pairs are divided into three main groups – majors, minors and exotic pairs. The main difference between the pairs is their liquidity which is a result of the trading volume of these pair. E.g., the major currency pairs are the most traded pairs and each include the USD and another currency, while the most traded minor pairs include one of the three major non-USD currencies (The Euro, the UK Pound and the Japanese Yen).
Just like stocks, you can trade currency based on what you think its value is (or where it's headed). But the big difference with forex is that you can trade up or down just as easily. If you think a currency will increase in value, you can buy it. If you think it will decrease, you can sell it. With a market this large, finding a buyer when you're selling and a seller when you're buying is much easier than in in other markets. Maybe you hear on the news that China is devaluing its currency to draw more foreign business into its country. If you think that trend will continue, you could make a forex trade by selling the Chinese currency against another currency, say, the US dollar. The more the Chinese currency devalues against the US dollar, the higher your profits. If the Chinese currency increases in value while you have your sell position open, then your losses increase and you want to get out of the trade.
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